Preemption, weak concealed carry bill pass House Second Reading

Preemption, weak concealed carry bill pass House on Second Reading

March 13, 2003 - SB24 and SB25 passed the House today on Second Reading today, which is where most amendments and debate are done. SB25 wasn't changed, but SB24 was.

SB25, the preemption bill, will have a Third reading vote on the House floor on Friday.  Assuming no third reading amendments, it will sent directly to the Governor's desk (the Senate already passed the exact version the House debated today).

Dave Kopel published a sharp paper on SB25, detailing what it does and does not do, at:

http://www.davekopel.org/2A/IB/Limited-Preemption.htm

 

Concealed Carry

As reported, SB24 sponsor Al White ran his amendment to, among other things, change the expiration on training to 10 years for law enforcement and veterans. That makes it the same as training for the average citizen -- it must have been within the last 10 years.

But the main thing SB24 did, and didn't do, was keep the database until 2007, when it would sunset.

Other amendments were fought off viciously, including our effort to remove the database entirely. State Rep. Kevin Lundberg ran that amendment.  State Rep. Pam Rhodes ran an amendment to lower the fee (from $100 to $50, for a five year permit) and to make former law enforcement go through the exact process the rest of us must endure.

By threatening to run an amendment, State Rep. Mike May forced Governor Owens to admit that DOW's hunter safety training (conducted by what is considered a law enforcment agency, and therefore allowable training under SB24) would satisfy the training requirements.

Rhodes and Lundberg forced the House to make recorded votes on their amendments, which is one of the toughest things to do as a legislator.  Party leadership has a fit, threatening careers and cajoling these "rebels", who's only sin is that they want to allow citizens to practice their God-given rights with as little government interference as possible.

Though these three amendments failed, it forced the other changes to the bill.  We'll post those votes electronically soon, as they serve as great reminders of who is REALLY pro-gun, and who is so afraid to rock the boat that they will oppose gun rights.

In the end, it was the efforts of a small number of House Conservatives that forced some of the changes to SB24. SB24 now allows hunters safety as an accepted form of training, your training does expire as early as a previous version of the bill, and the database sunsets in 2007 (as opposed to never).  Again, NONE of this would have happened without RMGO and the true pro-gun leaders of the legislature.

Notable are the efforts of two freshmen: Kevin Lundberg and Mike May. Both showed an extremely stiff spine, something that distinguishes them from the normal invertebrates who populate the legislature.  If you live in their districts (Lundberg represents parts of Larimer county and a little bit of Weld, while Mike May represents a part of Douglas county), or even if you don't, it is worth dropping a note to them thanking them for their fortitude.

Lundburg's e-mail address is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , May's is This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

It wouldn't hurt sending a note to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., who is the lone female in the legislature who has really stood behind freedom.

These three legislators were backed up by Greg Brophy (another freshmen who showed guts), Ted Harvey, Bill Crane, Mark Cloer and, of course, Dave Schultheis, who worked diligently for weeks in advance to force changes in SB24. If we had just a few more of these type of legislators, SB24 would have looked much better and Colorado citizens could look forward to more freedom.

As it is, SB24 isn't much to brag about: it will take years to remove some of the more objectionable provisions of this new law.

SB24 will be heard on Third reading in the House on Friday. Once passed, it will go to the Senate where the House changes must either be accepted (it can "concur") or, failing that, a conference committee must be appointed. Until both chambers have voted on and passed the exact same version, it cannot go to the Governor.

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